Industry-Sponsored Research Week
Industry-Sponsored Research Management sample issue

Telecom Italia’s novel approach to industry collaboration features Joint Open Labs


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

A blog post from the University Industry Innovation Network outlines the interesting collaboration model being employed by Telecom Italia (TIM) with Italian universities. The collaborations occur primarily through what are called Joint Open Labs (JOLs), described as “private company sites that are established [in] the heart of the collaborating university campuses. continue reading »

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Universities, academic start-ups part of IBM’s quantum computing push


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

IBM is making a big push in its quantum computing commercialization efforts, expanding its IBM Q Network to include eight start-ups, some with university roots. continue reading »

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Drexel University, U-Mich, GW launching a plasma research center


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

Drexel University is launching a Philadelphia-based research center dedicated to the study of plasma, an activated ionized gas with potential applications in medicine, defense, food processing and a variety of other industries. Funding for the center – which is a joint project with the University of Michigan and George Washington University – comes from a five-year National Science Foundation grant. continue reading »

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International Survey of Research University Leadership: View of Technology Transfer and Sponsored Research Offices


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

The International Survey of Research University Leadership: View of Technology Transfer and Sponsored Research Offices includes 70 pages of in-depth commentary and analysis based on extensive surveying of 53 colleges and universities.

This one-of-a-kind resource provides a rich set of benchmarks and data to compare against your own university’s technology transfer and sponsored research efforts. You’ll find detailed data on promoting technologies, staffing, budgets, managing patents, obtaining research grants, promoting technologies, incentivizing staff for IP creation, and publicizing research achievements, along with invaluable peer advice. This study is jam-packed with dozens of easy to scan charts and figures displaying critical data you can’t find in any other publication.

For complete details, CLICK HERE >>

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U of Alberta receives funding to hire AI research chair from Google-owned company


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

DeepMind, the artificial intelligence company owned by Google, is expanding an existing relationship with the University of Alberta by funding a new research chair. continue reading »

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Pfizer Canada puts $800K behind research at MaRS Innovation


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

Pfizer Canada has made an $800,000 contribution to MaRS Innovation to support health sciences research there. The MaRS Innovation-Pfizer Translational Research Fund will be managed by MaRS Innovation, with priority given to projects in cardiovascular disease, inflammation, immunology, rare diseases, vaccines, and oncology. continue reading »

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Optics giant Zeiss breaks ground on innovation campus with plans for university collaborations


By David Schwartz
Published: April 10th, 2018

German optics giant Zeiss has broken ground on a new innovation and start-up campus in Karlsruhe that the company describes as a “new space for carve-outs and greater collaboration between business and academia.” continue reading »

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UNL seed fund fosters external partnerships with eye on sponsored research


By David Schwartz
Published: April 3rd, 2018

A new seed funding program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln aims to assist faculty in forging partnerships with community entities, pairings that research leaders hope will lead to sponsored research collaborations. And the program intentionally goes beyond the sciences to include liberal arts and other low-tech areas, with a goal of reaching out to the community and creating better relationships to break down the “Ivory Tower” perceptions that often serve as a barrier to partnerships.

The three UNL researchers who received the first round of awards, from biological sciences, psychology and English, will work with a chemical manufacturer, a dog training academy and a writers collective, respectively, on projects that benefit both parties. Whether any of them actually leads to a formal sponsored research arrangement isn’t the key metric program developers will be watching — but they’d be delighted if any of them does.

Is sponsored research collaboration a specific aim of the Partnerships Seed Funding Program — or would it be a happy coincidence? “It’s a little bit of both,” says Matthew L. Jockers, PhD, associate dean for research and partnerships in UNL’s College of Arts and Science and associate professor of English, who heads up the seed funding program. “We’d like to have any kind of sponsored research,” he explains. “But it was imperative to me to not just define this as a game for the sciences, because community partnership has benefits across the college.”

There’s a deeper context for his motives: “Think about what’s going on in the country, as far as relations between universities and the public, and charges that academia is in a bubble, that ‘they’re doing their own thing,’” he says. “We’re very interested in being connected with local and national communities — and breaking down walls. When we’re out there partnering, we’re demonstrating that we’re not an entity external to the community. We don’t want to be. We see ourselves very much as integrated into Nebraska.”

That’s a university-wide focus at UNL, as it is at more and more universities. Jockers, in fact, developed the seed funding program as one of his first duties. The project he launched first is designed to assist faculty engagement in partnerships “to promote economic growth and assist the public good,” Jockers says, by encouraging them to “move their work and their thinking beyond the lab bench and academic journals, to build bridges out into the community by partnering with companies and non-profits.”

Step one: “The first thing I did was conduct a survey of the entire faculty of the College,” he tells

ISRM. “It was a pretty broad survey, and we got a 70% return rate. The idea was to take the pulse of faculty attitudes toward external partnership.”

Key questions included these:

  • Do you participate in any external partnerships now?
  • What has your experience been?
  • Are you interested in developing more partnerships?
  • What’s your attitude toward external partnerships in general?
  • What barriers exist to participating in more external partnerships?

“We took the results for a starting point on various initiatives we’re developing around building a culture of partnerships in the College,” Jockers adds, noting that while the seed funding program is “an initiative of just the College of Arts and Sciences at this point,” his counterparts in other Colleges “have begun to see what we’re doing — and they find it attractive.” The program was designed, he emphasizes, to address the barriers to partnerships that the faculty survey unearthed.

“Three major things came across as far as barriers to engaging in external partnerships,” Jockers says:

  1. Lack of time, “especially for the more junior faculty.”
  2. For senior faculty, “the biggest barrier was lack of resources to start a new project, financial resources in particular.”
  3. The third barrier identified by the survey was “a general lack of education and understanding of how to engage in external partnerships, what that looks like and how it fits in with how they’re evaluated as faculty member.”

Says Jockers: “We set out to solve those three things — time, money and understanding.” The fund that resulted is “an internal seed fund in the College,” he says. “Faculty could apply for up to $10,000, so if the partner is in Los Angeles, for example, the faculty member can use it for travel or supplies to jump start the relationship — or to buy out course time. Junior faculty who needed time could use it to buy time, and senior faculty could use the financial resources to pay for RAs or for lab supplies. It’s pretty flexible money.”

A detailed article on the partnership seed funding model appears in the March issue of Industry-Sponsored Research Management. To subscribe and access the full article, along with the publication’s entire archive of success strategies and best practices for building university-industry research partnerships, CLICK HERE.

For a free sample copy of Industry-Sponsored Research Management, CLICK HERE

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Singapore’s A*Star revamps structure, separates industry-focused research institutes


By David Schwartz
Published: April 3rd, 2018

The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star), a leading research institute in Singapore, is changing how it manages its research activities, in part to enhance its focus on industry sponsored research. continue reading »

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When All Else Fails: How, When and Why to Terminate an IP License


By David Schwartz
Published: April 3rd, 2018

No one wants to terminate a license. Sometimes, however, in the face of a licensee’s failure to move a technology forward, it’s the best option available to give university IP a fighting chance to make it to the marketplace. Other precipitating factors may include bankruptcy, breach of contract, non-performance, or royalty payment disputes.

It’s not a decision you can take lightly — there are many factors at stake, including the risk of souring your relationship with the licensee, who may be a faculty member, student or local corporation in good standing. It’s critical to communicate effectively, while making sure all the proper steps have been taken in accordance with the terms outlined in the agreement.

That’s why Tech Transfer Central’s Distance Learning Division has scheduled this important webinar being led by Seema Levy, JD, Assistant Director of Research Initiatives and Risk Management at SUNY’s Stony Brook University: When All Else Fails: How, When and Why to Terminate an IP License, scheduled for April 19. For complete program details and to register, CLICK HERE.

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Rutgers inks research deal around developing treatments for muscle wasting disorders


By David Schwartz
Published: April 3rd, 2018

Rutgers University has signed a research agreement with MYOS RENS Technology, Inc., a bionutrition and  biotherapeutics company focused on products that improve muscle health. Under the agreement, Rutgers researchers will focus on discovering compounds and products for promoting the growth and development of muscle tissue for potential treatment of muscle wasting disorders. continue reading »

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Best Practices in University Research and Tech Transfer Compliance


By David Schwartz
Published: April 3rd, 2018

When it comes to matters of regulatory compliance in research, there is no room for error. Fortunately, strong education and airtight monitoring systems can prevent the damaging consequences of non-compliance that can result in a black mark on your university’s reputation – as well as its future research funding.

That’s why we’ve created the Best Practices in University Research and Tech Transfer Compliance distance learning collection. The collection consists of three distance learning programs, complete with all original program materials, filled with expert compliance guidance related to the Bayh-Dole Act, reporting guidelines for iEdison, and SBIR/STTR funding regulations.

You’ll receive the recorded programs in three formats — DVD, On-Demand Video, and PDF Transcript — so you can listen and share them with staff at your convenience in whatever format you choose. It’s a great addition to your training library you can use over and over again.

The three programs included are:

  • Bayh-Dole Compliance Check-up: Effectively Address the Challenge of Complacency
  • Maintaining Compliance with iEdison: A Practical Guide for Universities
  • Avoid SBIR/STTR Fraud and Abuse Allegations in University Research

For complete details, CLICK HERE >>

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