Tech Transfer eNews Blog

Participate in salary survey of tech transfer personnel


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

Tech Transfer Central is conducting a salary survey of TTO personnel, and we hope to soon have a valuable benchmarking and data-filled report to offer. To make it as accurate and useful as possible for you and your colleagues in tech transfer, we need your help — and we’re providing $50 for just a few minutes of your time. 

Click here to take our brief salary survey questionnaire and receive a $50 coupon applicable to any of our Tech Transfer Central products.

The questionnaire will take only 5 to 10 minutes to complete, and all data will be confidential and anonymous. Once you submit your survey response, you’ll immediately receive a $50 coupon to use on your next renewal, a distance learning program, any best practices resource or book, or any other product we offer.

For questions that do not apply to you, please leave the answer blank. We appreciate your participation and look forward to producing an in-depth report filled with salary data later this year. Thank you in advance for your help.

Start survey

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Strategies for managing underperforming licensees: Enforcer, counselor, or both?


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

A detailed article on strategies for dealing effectively with struggling licensees appears in the September issue of Technology Transfer Tactics. To subscribe and access the complete article, or for further subscription details, click here.

It happens to every TTO once in a while. You licensed patented technology to a company that just isn’t making enough progress, so your original expectations for licensing revenue, attainment of milestones, and associated fees aren’t met.

What can you do? There’s the nuclear option of clawing back the IP, but in many cases the better course might be to amend the agreement and begin looking for ways to support the licensee in reaching the specified goals.

The Cleveland Clinic Foundation recently found itself in a similar situation with technology licensed to Notox Bioscience, which is using patented IP relating to the treatment of a neuromuscular abnormality. The company is seeking to produce products in the areas of aesthetics, drug-free pain management, body contouring, and sweat control.

The company recently announced that Cleveland Clinic Foundation had agreed to amend the original terms of the licensing agreement, the third such amendment since 2013, and extend the deadline for Notox Bioscience to reach the first commercial milestone — submission of regulatory filings — to December 2023. The amendment also requires Notox Bioscience to begin making partial refunds of approximately $215,000 of patent fees accrued by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation at the rate of $25,000 per calendar quarter, the company announced.

The tech transfer office at Cleveland Clinic Foundation declined a request to comment on the amendment. Notox Bioscience reported that the license agreement is valid until the expiration of the last to expire of certain patents. “In accordance with the license agreement, we are required to pay the clinic a royalty based on the sale of certain products, a milestone payment upon the first commercial sale of the first such product, and a percentage of any sublicense,” the company reported.

CEO Zoran Konevi said the amendment “signals that our key partnerships are stronger than ever, and it is also heartening to receive such fantastic support.”

That kind of flexibility and support is one way to go, but a tougher stance is warranted in some cases, says Alfonso Garcia Chan, JD, principal with the McKool Smith law firm in Dallas, TX. He focuses his practice specifically on litigating and licensing complex IP cases on behalf of universities, research institutes, and technology companies.

When your original expectations for licensing revenue and attainment of milestones and associated fees keep getting pushed back, your choice of action may depend on who is involved, Chan says.

“If the licensee is affiliated with the university and primarily staffed by professors and students, more patience may be needed to incubate and allow the company to grow to viability. Financial requirements should rarely be reduced, but timelines can be adjusted,” he says. “If, however, the licensee is a more sophisticated commercial or industrial company, then the requirements and milestones should be more strictly policed with notices of breach, warnings, and audits.”

Click here to continue reading this article with a subscription to Technology Transfer Tactics. Already a subscriber? Click here to log in.

Did you know? A subscription to Technology Transfer Tactics gives you immediate access to the publication’s entire 15-year archive of past issues? It’s an instant library of practical guidance, case studies, and best practices to help guide your technology commercialization efforts! Click here for more details.

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Biotech spinout from U Penn raises $165M to advance new in vivo cell therapies


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

Capstan Therapeutics, a biotech company with roots at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn), has emerged from stealth mode with a whopping $165 million in funding to develop safer, first-in-class medicines through cell therapy and genetic medicine techniques. continue reading »

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Lessons from Industry Tech Scouts: How Universities Can Meet Industry’s Needs while Fostering Long-Term Partnerships


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

In a world where success in many corporations depends on their ability to produce technology innovations better and faster than their competitors, industry has become increasingly reliant on the technology expertise and associated IP found in university labs – and universities are competing hard to fill their pipelines. Technology Scouting is an essential component of this process – often, it’s the starting point for developing crucial corporate technology assets, and universities who want to score partnerships and patent licensing deals must have a good grasp of this critical role within the businesses they work with. 

Technology scouts identify technologies and researchers of interest, evaluate their fit with the company’s strategic objectives, and build relationships and collaborations with universities to help fuel their innovation engines. The key question for universities is: How can you ensure your innovative technologies and scientists are within the sight lines of collaborative companies?

That’s why we are producing this insider’s look at tech scouting featuring two Brown University commercialization leaders along with Dow, Inc. technology scout Liz Dhulst and Robert Ashcraft, a 10-year veteran of the Open Innovation team for the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology.

When you attend Lessons from Industry Tech Scouts: How Universities Can Meet Industry’s Needs while Fostering Long-Term Partnerships, scheduled for September 29th, you’ll hear from both sides of the fence – what corporations are looking for in a partner, and how universities can position themselves to meet those needs.

For complete program details and to register, click here.

Also coming soon:

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U of Cincinnati start-up develops first-ever monitor for emergency ventilator


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

A start-up from the University of Cincinnati (UC) is on a mission to improve emergency care with a simple but perhaps life-saving innovation. continue reading »

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MD Anderson and Radiopharm Theranostics launch joint venture to develop new cancer treatments


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Radiopharm Theranostics have launched a joint venture to develop and commercialize radiopharmaceutical therapeutics for cancer. continue reading »

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Just published: The University-Industry Engagement Book of Best Practices


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

The University-Industry Engagement Book of Best Practices has just been published. This all-new 326-page resource is chock-full of how-to strategies and case studies covering the most crucial responsibilities of corporate relations and industry engagement professionals. The rich collection of best practices offers success strategies and expert guidance straight from your industry engagement colleagues focused exclusively on building, managing, and expanding corporate partnerships for your university.

The University-Industry Engagement Book of Best Practices is packed with over 80 detailed articles filled with tips, tactics, ideas, expert guidance, charts and graphs, and nuts-and-bolts solutions in 9 critical areas: Contracting; Partnership Development and Stewardship; Industry Advisory Boards; Office Structure and Integration; Talent Pipeline Development; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Faculty Outreach and Engagement; Alumni Outreach and Engagement; and Economic Development.

For complete details and to view the full table of contents, click here.

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Pitt start-up aims to use NFTs to inform patients in studies of their medical condition


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

A University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) start-up aims to use non-fungible tokens (NFTs) to inform patients in research studies of their medical condition – filling a gap that has long been an ethical dilemma. continue reading »

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Northumbria U start-up develops breath sampling device to detect lung infection and disease


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

A start-up from Northumbria University has developed a breath sampling device that could assist in the diagnosis of a range of diseases and infections, including COVID. continue reading »

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Company owner going to jail for fraud in grant funding schemes


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

Two tech companies and their owner have been sentenced in federal court for defrauding government agencies as well as the SBIR/STTR programs. continue reading »

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Best Practices in Preventing and Managing Research Fraud and Misconduct


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

Effective management of sponsored research is a critical factor in the overall success of every university’s research enterprise. From avoiding conflicts of interest to managing regulatory and fiscal responsibilities, the challenges are diverse and complex — and the stakes are high in terms of research dollars, harsh non-compliance penalties, and the university’s reputation.

That’s why it is so important to identify and implement best practices and proven strategies – and why we’ve created this valuable collection of distance learning sessions: Best Practices in Preventing and Managing Research Fraud and Misconduct.

This collection comes with more than 30 pages of reference materials and includes these three strategy-packed programs:

  • Discovering, Reporting and Managing Fiscal Misconduct in University Research
  • Compliance Management and Fraud Prevention in Sponsored Research
  • Sponsored Research Compliance: Best Practices for Working with Auditors

For complete program and faculty details, click here.

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Qatar University start-up aims to make blockchain transactions less costly, more energy-efficient


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

A Qatar University (QU) start-up is commercializing a blockchain platform to enable more cost-effective, energy-efficient transactions in the digital economy. continue reading »

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