Tech Transfer eNews Blog

Rowan University venture fund gets $20M infusion to support more start-ups


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

Rowan University’s start-up fund is expanding to support more evolving businesses from within and outside the university. continue reading »

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UK researchers develop device to restore sense of touch in stroke patients


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 21st, 2022

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK have developed a technology that could restore the sense of finger contact lost by people who have suffered a stroke. continue reading »

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Stanford’s retreats help TTO staff identify and address issues, each other


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

A detailed article on the Stanford OTL’s staff retreats appears in the August issue of Technology Transfer Tactics. To subscribe and access the complete article, or for further subscription details, click here.

Many corporations regularly hold department and unit retreats for any number of reasons — from helping the members of the staff improve their communications and ability to work together, to addressing key issues of the day. So, if major companies find them valuable, why not university TTOs?

Why not, indeed, said the leadership of the Stanford Office of Technology Licensing (OTL), which has now held several such retreats. “A retreat can fulfill many different purposes — particularly if it is office-specific,” says Karin H. Immergluck, executive director of the Stanford OTL, who notes that she also led retreats in her previous position at UC San Francisco.

The Stanford OTL retreats are large, she notes, including about 50 people. “The first one we held after I joined Stanford was really to jell the re-organization we had just implemented,” says Immergluck. “I think that’s a very important goal for a retreat — if you have recently restructured or re-organized.”

The entire office came together at an off-site venue. “I always recommend that,” says Immergluck. “You find a park with some sort of rental, or a conference facility.” The first retreat, she notes, was at the Redwood City Marina, which has a “very nice” conference facility.

“It was relaxing, with a nice view,” she recalls. “Each group had permission to take time and sit with each other, figure out the new workflows, and how to work more efficiently together.”

Each retreat has a purpose, she continues. The second one, for instance, was virtual due to the pandemic. “Morale was down, people were suffering — missing seeing each other — so it was more of a social purpose,” she explains. “A lot of it was just to give people permission to relax, to have fun, and get to know each other.” The meeting, she adds, included breakout rooms for smaller groups to interact.

The most recent retreat was in a park, where the staff could have lunch outside. “It was really nice,” says Immergluck. “That was to bring everyone together; we flew in all the remote workers, and everyone was asked to come in person. It was specifically to remind everyone what the grand vision is, what we’re part of — the big picture — [and] how working within the Stanford landscape brings value to the university.” All the activities were designed for people to get to know each other. “We had so many new employees (at least 25%) that had never met in person,” she explains.

There definitely were some advantages to being able to have the retreat in person, notes Immergluck. “This felt like team bonding; the activities were all focused on team-building,” she shares.

Games and activities were focused on that goal. For example, objects or characters (i.e., salt and pepper) were pasted on everyone’s back and each participant was half of a pair. “You were allowed to walk around the room and pose ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions to find your partner,” she says. “Then those pairs would sit down and find three things they had in common with each other.”

There were other team games “and a lot of laughter,” says Glennia Campbell, director of the Industrial Contracts Office At lunch, participants were encouraged not to sit with people from the same team. “I did not know the finance team or the marketing team,” Campbell points out. “Everyone really enjoyed it; we got lots of positive feedback.”

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Did you know? A subscription to Technology Transfer Tactics gives you immediate access to the publication’s entire 15-year archive of past issues? It’s an instant library of practical guidance, case studies, and best practices to help guide your technology commercialization efforts! Click here for more details.

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Harvard launches suite of programs to boost technology commercialization


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

Harvard University has launched a new initiative to accelerate the commercialization of university technologies. continue reading »

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Revenue Splits for Multiple Inventors: How to Slice the Pie and Prevent Future Disputes


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

When your TTO is dealing with IP having multiple inventors, splitting revenue — whether it be royalties, license and option fees, or equity — can be a complicated and occasionally contentious process.  And when the splits involve more than one institution or a license incorporating multiple inventions, it’s even trickier. While there are no foolproof strategies to eliminate future disputes over revenue splits, there are ways to minimize the risks while also demonstrating to inventors that your main goal is to be fair to everyone involved.

That’s why we’ve partnered with Dr. Terry Bray, Executive Director of Licensing, Physical Sciences and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Center for Innovation, for this informative, problem-solving webinar: Revenue Splits for Multiple Inventors: How to Slice the Pie and Prevent Future Disputes, scheduled for September 20th.

Dr. Bray will cover common structures and scenarios for how inventor revenue shares are split, who is eligible to share revenues, and resolving disputes when they arise.  You’ll learn the pros and cons of different approaches to splitting revenues between inventors and discover strategies for refining your institution’s policies on this topic. For completed details or to register, click here.

Also coming soon:

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U of Chicago researcher wins award for novel drug delivery system


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

University of Chicago researcher and entrepreneur Xiaoyang Wu has received the 2022 Duckworth Family Commercial Promise Award for his work on a promising new cancer drug delivery system. continue reading »

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U of Bath start-up raises £1.1M to commercialize painless glucose monitoring tech


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

A University of Bath start-up has raised £1.1 million to commercialize a non-invasive technology for monitoring glucose levels. continue reading »

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New editions of three royalty rate references published


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

Newly updated editions of three of our popular royalty rate references have just been published.  Each one offers updated data on licensing deal terms with real-world deal summaries that including the property licensed, the royalty rates, the licensor, and the licensee.

The three reports are listed below. Please click on the titles for complete details:

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SynaptixBio signs license agreement with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to develop first treatment for rare neurodegenerative disease


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

UK-based biotech company SynaptixBio has signed a global licensing deal with the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) to develop and commercialize the world’s first treatment for TUBB4A leukodystrophy. continue reading »

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Dynavax signs option agreement with QIMR Berghofer to develop vaccine against cytomegalovirus


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

California-based Dynavax Technologies has signed an exclusive option agreement with QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia to develop and commercialize a vaccine candidate against cytomegalovirus (CMV). continue reading »

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Auburn tech transfer office gets a new name


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

The technology transfer office at Auburn University has a new name. Formerly known as the Office of Innovation Advancement and Commercialization (AIC), the newly titled Intellectual Property Exchange (IP Exchange) is comprised of existing AIC staff in an updated structure with more streamlined processes. continue reading »

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Proven Strategies for Rebranding and Revitalizing your TTO


By Jesse Schwartz
Published: September 14th, 2022

The role of technology transfer has evolved. And for some TTOs, the structure, branding, marketing, and modes of operation have simply not kept pace with those changes — nor with changes in expectations from administrators, legislators, faculty, and other key stakeholders.

The days of being strictly faculty-service oriented are gone, as are the days of vanity start-ups and patenting every disclosure. The focus has shifted to one that translates research into tangible economic development — jobs, tax revenues, start-ups, and return on research investments. While some forward-thinking offices have stayed ahead of the curve, others are lagging behind — and need a radical makeover.

That’s why we created Proven Strategies for Rebranding and Revitalizing your TTO, a distance learning case study collection that focuses on two standout rebranding projects from the University of New Hampshire and the University of Virginia. Each university embarked on a major renovation that involved upper administration as well as the entire researcher community — and required significant changes to the organizational structure and culture alike. And both restructuring efforts also brought huge rewards.

The collection includes on-demand videos, transcripts, and original program materials – and comes with unlimited access for your entire organization.

For complete details, click here.

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