Tech Transfer Central
University-Industry Engagement Advisor

Technology Transfer Tactics, April 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, April 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the April 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 4, April 2019

  • Lawsuit charging prof stole student’s IP highlights need for layers of due diligence. Technology transfer personnel often talk about how hard it is to get to the finish line with a promising IP asset. This means getting the IP properly developed, licensed and commercialized so that the university and contributing inventors are then on the receiving end of a windfall that can potentially fund research and improvements at the institution for years to come. It’s a rare and wonderful occurrence, to be sure. Cause for celebration.
  • As mission expands, Emory TTO streamlines processes and enhances productivity. When a major university strives for more commercialization even outside usual areas like technology and medicine, the tech transfer office has to be prepared for an increased workload. Adding staff is never an easy route, so improving the work process in a way that takes some of the burden off the existing team might be the only option.
  • AUTM panel reveals how to tap “gold mine” of data for licensing. The collection of data by research institutions is a critical part of innumerable projects, and the size and scope of those data sets is often massive. But what some TTO leaders may not realize, said Bin Yan, director of the Office of Technology Transfer at the University of Miami, is that “you may be sitting on a gold mine.” Yan made her remarks as the head of a panel entitled “Strategies for Monetizing Data at Universities” at the recent AUTM 2019 conference in Austin, TX.
  • New regulations turn up the heat on compliance reporting. It was never easy to report inventions through Interagency Edison (iEdison). Now, with new regulations under the Bayh-Dole Act that have been in effect since October 1, 2018, the stakes are even higher. An action step of the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) plan for incorporating the new regulations is to “Establish a modern platform for reporting data on intellectual property resulting from Federal R&D.” The current iEdison platform is about to be updated.
  • Brandeis rebrands and makes a splash with AUTM exhibit. The newly re-branded tech transfer office for Brandeis University, Brandeis Innovation, is making heads turn — most recently with its exhibit booth at this year’s annual AUTM meeting in Austin, TX. It’s not that common for a TTO to exhibit at AUTM, so what were they doing there and why?

Posted April 16th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, March 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, March 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the March 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 3, March 2019

  • When worlds collide: Help ensure a tight fit between start-up CEOs and faculty founders. Given the dearth of entrepreneurial talent in many locations outside of major tech ecosystems, finding an experienced veteran who is capable and willing to take a technology-based start-up forward is a difficult task. Indeed, the folks in charge of new ventures at universities are typically thrilled to land a candidate with the requisite business skills, technical expertise, and network to attract investors and ultimately make a splash in the marketplace.
  • Board seats can pose dilemmas for university start-ups, TTO leaders. A start-up’s board of directors can be enormously influential in driving the company forward and improving the likelihood of success, so questions related to the makeup of that board are no small matter. University leaders understandably feel like they have a stake in the success or failure of the start-up, so the inclination often is to have someone on the board representing the school.
  • Heard in the Halls: AUTM 2019. The 2019 edition in Austin, TX, was another outstanding year for AUTM’s annual meeting, with nearly 2,000 attendees and the usual complement of practical workshops and sessions. We’ll be featuring in-depth coverage of several of those sessions in coming issues, but in the meantime we’ve gathered our annual collection of short takes and ideas gleaned from attendees and speakers during the event.
  • Incubator makes shift from grant-sponsored program to post-money SAFEs. Velocity, The University of Waterloo’s (Ontario) start-up incubator, is introducing a major change in the way it will be funding its pitch competitions.
  • Alumshares makes investing in start-ups more accessible. A Raleigh, NC, native with a background in real estate is shaking up the way university TTOs are finding funding for university start-ups and other commercialization efforts.
  • University start-ups gain global reach without leaving home. Start-up companies that want to do business internationally often find themselves in a Catch-22. They know they must build contacts in overseas markets, but they don’t have time or money to travel the world. Yet strong international contacts could be the fuel that pushes some start-ups over the edge to long-term success.

Posted March 19th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, February 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, February 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the February 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 2, February 2019

  • Litigation financing can be a ‘no brainer’ for some university patents. With a typical patent lawsuit costing several million dollars to litigate, with no guarantee of recovering that or any more compensation, the idea of having someone else pony up the money can be appealing to any university. For smaller schools that have limited resources but could benefit from the protection of their patents, the appeal is even greater.
  • UC-Santa Cruz digitizes disclosures, NDAs and MTAs to boost faculty service. About one year ago Jeffrey M. Jackson, MS, JD, director of intellectual property management for the University of California at Santa Cruz, implemented a digitized online form for invention disclosures. Since then, 66 invention disclosures have been submitted; prior to last year, he says, the average number of disclosures per year was 44 — a full 50% increase.
  • Total compliance with Bayh-Dole assignments must be goal. The recent update in federal regulations regarding Bayh-Dole compliance has some university TTO leaders wondering just how much is enough when it comes to getting faculty inventors to sign over their intellectual property.
  • U Saskatchewan takes fast and simple approach to licensing. The University of Saskatchewan’s “Fast License,” is the latest entry in the bandwagon among TTOs offering simplified licenses with very favorable contract terms, making a wager that it will be more beneficial in the long run to have many licenses at a lower royalty than just a few at a higher rate.
  • TTO directors share their offices’ goals for 2019. Each time a new year rolls around, it’s a chance to make assessments of past progress and to set goals and resolutions for the upcoming months. We wanted to learn what tech transfer directors had established as their office goals for the upcoming year, and how they planned to meet those objectives.
  • Kentucky’s C3 initiative brings shared tech transfer services statewide. The state of Kentucky — led by its two biggest universities — is launching an unprecedented effort to combine and share tech transfer resources among all the state’s schools in a bid to magnify the impact of research commercialization and “raise all boats.”

Posted February 19th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, January 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, January 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the January 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 1, January 2019

  • TTOs employ divergent approaches to incentive pay for licensing staff. Businesses of all kinds have been using incentive pay to drive behavior for years, but does it work in the murky realm of academia/tech transfer? It’s tricky, to say the least, but surveys suggest that roughly a third of TTOs have some sort of incentive compensation in place. The thing is, the characteristics of these plans vary widely from team-based approaches which include a broad array of performance goals to individually focused plans that key in on a narrow set of indicators.
  • $31.6M award illustrates risks in co-development deals, even decades later. The $31.6 million awarded to Washington University of St. Louis (WUSTL) in a lawsuit levied against its patent license partner the University of Wisconsin is a reminder that co-development deals can come crashing to the ground years after they were initiated. And when they do, more often than not the cause is traced to poorly defined terms.
  • Global EIR programs spreading across U.S. to fill start-up visa gap. According to Science and Engineering Indicators 2018, a National Science Board report, there were about 240,000 international students on temporary visas enrolled in science and engineering graduate programs in 2015. This represented 36% of total U.S. graduate enrollment. Any of these students who opted to stay in the U.S. to create a business encountered immigration laws that, absent a start-up visa, make it difficult for them to stay here.
  • Program seeks to convince UNM grads to ‘boomerang’ to hometown jobs. Sometimes, it seems, you can almost do “too good a job” at helping tech-oriented university graduates pursue successful careers. The problem, you see, is that many of the high prestige universities where graduate school can lead to desirable jobs may be in another state, creating a “brain drain” back home, and losing the potential benefit of a large number of innovators and start-up founders.
  • Marquette’s Explorer Challenge program fuels innovation. It may sound like a NASA project, but it’s really quite grounded. It’s the brainchild of Michael R. Lovell, president of Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI, and it’s called the Explorer Challenge Program. The program was judged so effective that it was recently selected as the winner in the Innovation Category of the University Economic Development Association’s annual Awards of Excellence.

Posted January 16th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, December 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, December 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the December 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 12, December 2018

  • Innovative TTOs look at new ways to leverage the express licensing concept. While many TTOs have adopted express licenses in one form or another, some are still experimenting with new and different ways to leverage the concept — perhaps getting more than just additional licensing transactions out of the process.
  • As faculty start-ups proliferate, so do concerns over COI. This fall, conflict-of-interest (COI) and conflict-of-commitment (COC) issues pushed medical researchers and executives at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City into the national headlines via a series of articles co-published by ProPublica and The New York Times.
  • Purdue commercialization roars after TTO itself becomes entrepreneurial. Purdue University has rapidly become a powerhouse in tech transfer, with frequent news about promising start-ups, new discoveries, and impressive financial returns. The quick rise from an ordinary tech transfer program to one that is now the envy of many schools has people wondering: what’s in the secret sauce?
  • U Mich bell-ringing ceremony generates excitement as start-ups double. Sometimes all it takes is a simple idea that snowballs into something greater. In the case of a new tradition started at the University of Michigan’s TTO, it began with the ringing of a bell. Now, they’re celebrating nearly double the number of start-ups this year compared to last.
  • Brown U putting ecosystem pieces together to spur economic growth. A growing number of universities have incorporated strengthening economic development into their missions, often heavily involving the TTO, but few have adopted as ambitious a plan as the initiative recently launched by Brown University. Brown’s “Innovative Economy” initiative, launched in June, outlines five key areas of focus.

Posted December 18th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, November 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, November 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the November 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 11, November 2018

  • VCU Ventures shakes up standard start-up development process. Aggressive licensing terms and a customized pre-accelerator program that includes a faculty/entrepreneur “dating service” and the early use of end-user feedback are among the features that VCU Ventures plans to use to promote start-up development at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond.
  • Express license used by DoD gets deals done at breakneck speed. The only difference between the express license built by TechLink for the Department of Defense (DoD) and the form they previously used for licensing is that it is faster — much faster.
  • Legal disputes with university start-ups often traced to poor contracts. Tech transfer offices focus so much on encouraging faculty entrepreneurs and fostering their start-ups that the need for carefully constructed legal agreements can be seen as just a necessary formality among friends.
  • New tool brings blockchain technology to TTOs for IP protection. Blockchain technology, originally designed for digital currencies like Bitcoin, is now finding its way into other industries — including fields like university tech transfer that need to protect sensitive intellectual property. And, unlike banks’ reluctance to embrace cybercash, the IP industry appears to be welcoming blockchain technology.
  • Oxford updates mission, goals and strategies in bid to expand impact. Although Dr. Matt Perkins, Chief Executive Officer of Oxford University Innovation (OUI), insists that recent shifts in mission statement and strategy are “not really significant changes,” a bullet-point summary begs to differ.
  • Duke’s shift to service-based tech transfer model brings record results. Duke’s Office of Licensing and Ventures (OLV) has hit its stride in 2018, with record setting results in its completed fiscal year.

Posted November 16th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, October 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, October 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the October 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 10, October 2018

  • New online platforms connecting university start-ups and executive talent. Most universities love the idea of generating technology-based spinoffs, and it’s not hard to see why. Innovative start-ups can showcase an institution’s cerebral prowess while also bringing in revenue to support the academic enterprise and producing coveted jobs for stakeholders keen on economic development.
  • Dartmouth adds new faculty option for handling IP and start-up equity. Dartmouth College has found a new way to reward inventors for their contributions in the form of a new default distribution method for portfolio licenses — The Dartmouth Case Method. It takes into account how many times an inventor appears on different cases that are licensed by a company.
  • UVA’s quick and simple funding program boosts cross-discipline research. A research fund that requires faculty members to work with colleagues from separate disciplines is proving to be more popular than the creators ever imagined, making quick and easy funding available for projects that might never have been attempted without it.
  • StartupTree seeks to meet the “end-to-end needs” of entrepreneurship programs. It’s a sure sign of growth in any industry sector when third parties begin to offer software and services to manage tasks for those who toil in that field, and that’s exactly what’s happened in the burgeoning university entrepreneurship arena.
  • International partnerships bring solid benefits for TTOs. Commercializing discoveries made under international research collaborations with other universities is, of course, more of a hassle than similar deals with domestic partners — because of differences in language and legal systems, and even in expectations about how transferring technology to the commercial marketplace should proceed. But TTOs that have established international arrangements are adamant about at least one thing: It’s worth it.

Posted October 19th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, September 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, September 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the September 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 9, September 2018

  • TTOs build new ecosystems to keep spinoffs close to home. With economic development high on the priority list for most TTOs these days, it can really sting when promising, high-tech start-ups pull up stakes and move to larger cities or innovation hubs — taking all their potential jobs and investment dollars with them. Unfortunately, though, it’s a repeating scenario for many research institutions — even those that are awash with top-flight researchers and cutting-edge technologies.
  • Do you know what you’re paying for patent renewals? Many universities are wasting a lot of money on patent renewal services that are too expensive, but the tech transfer leaders responsible for the transactions either don’t realize they are being overcharged or are reluctant to let anyone know they negotiated a poor deal, according to one critic of renewal services.
  • Yissum transforms its website to reflect the evolution of tech transfer. The evolution of tech transfer over the past 25 years, and particularly within the past five, demands an approach to marketing that reflects that evolution. That’s a key assertion behind the new website launched this summer by Yissum, the Technology Transfer Company of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (www.yissum.co.il).
  • Super-accelerator ‘node’ program develops rural tech entrepreneurs. Most rural areas of the United States haven’t seen the same opportunities for technology commercialization and entrepreneurship that are available in more urban technology corridors or university towns. However, a pilot program in rural Iowa aims to change that.
  • Podcast series tells the “untold stories” behind tech transfer. A multi-faceted team at UNeMed – the University of Nebraska Medical Center TTO — has launched a podcast series designed to take some of the mystery out of tech transfer for a broad audience while promoting the school’s research successes as well as a positive message about academic innovation and commercialization in general.
  • Break down barriers to tap alumni funding for commercialization. With so many divisions of the university seeking funding from alumni, the competition can get testy as department leaders stake out their claims and resist incursions from others. TTO leaders may find that they are limited in the use of alumni lists, and the idea of a fundraising campaign for a start-up would be non-starter on many campuses.

Posted September 18th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, August 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, August 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the August 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 8, August 2018

  • Fine tune your technology briefs to avoid missed opportunities. Constructing the technology briefs used to market new innovations may seem like a simple enough task. Ideally, these are short write-ups designed to get the attention of interested suitors. But too many TTOs are failing to prioritize this basic but highly important function. As a result, promising technologies that really should have a shot at getting licensed may never get a look from potential licensees.
  • Chart helps guide TTOs in compliance with new Bayh-Dole revisions. The language of government regulations can be difficult to understand, and the recent updates to the Bayh-Dole regulations are no exception. To help TTO executives wade through them, and more importantly, ensure they comply with the new requirements, Tyson Benson, an attorney with the law firm of Harness Dickey, has created an easy to follow chart summarizing the actions required.
  • Entrepreneurship programs increasing their focus on job placement. While university entrepreneurship programs and the creation of start-ups would seem to go hand in hand, some recent research indicates universities may be making a more valuable contribution to the ecosystem through job creation than through generating start-ups.
  • Macquarie U takes on faculty engagement, introduces “Impact Canvas.” Engaging your faculty in the tech transfer process and bringing their expertise to bear on developing a commercialization plan are tall orders for every TTO. But those efforts can pay off handsomely, as they have at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia.
  • New structure at U Alaska generates improvements in disclosures, start-ups. What’s behind the dramatic improvement at The University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) since 2011? A complete shift in focus and creative new strategies under the guidance of Helena Wisniewski, PhD, FNAI, vice provost for research and graduate studies and chief research officer.

Posted August 16th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, July 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, July 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the July 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 7, July 2018

  • Adopt these best practices and boost the impact of inventor recognition programs. Inventor recognition programs can excite and motivate faculty and other inventors to participate in the innovation ecosystem, says Laura Schoppe, MBA, MSE, president of the technology transfer consulting firm Fuentek LLC in Cary, NC. But it takes more than just a quick thank you lunch to have a significant impact. “When you have an awards event and do it well, it has a lot more meaning for inventors than you may realize,” Schoppe says. “Everyone comes back from the event talking about how wonderful it was, and the people who didn’t attend ask, ‘Why wasn’t I invited?’ So it creates a conversation — and a desire to be part of the party the next time.”
  • Amgen decision puts billions in antibody patents at risk. Universities are facing the potential loss of billions of dollars from some of their most valuable assets in the wake of a recent decision on antibodies from the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals. TTOs should expect more PTAB challenges for antibody patents after the ruling, experts caution, and the best defense is understanding the complex legal reasoning that led to the vulnerability of these profitable patents.
  • Indiana U taps alumni for philanthropic venture fund. A $15 million venture fund at Indiana University is soliciting donations from the school’s 700,000 alumni, but the return on their investment will come only in the form of a tax deduction and the knowledge that they’re helping bring important discoveries to the marketplace. The fund works, according to its leader, because alumni can be motivated in venture funding the same way they can be for other donations that do not provide a financial return.
  • Leverage tools to pull potential licensees into the “marketing funnel.” Given the burgeoning array of internet-based tools, how do you optimize a marketing strategy for early-stage assets? Most agree that nothing beats face-to-face communications in terms of effectiveness, but such a strategy can only go so far when you’ve got hundreds of technologies in search of a match.

Posted July 11th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, June 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, June 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the June 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 6, June 2018

Special Focus: Women in Research Commercialization

If an internal audit found that, through some technical glitch or twist of fate, your TTO was ignoring a significant percentage of researchers and, as a result, was missing out on scores of potential inventions, patents, licenses, and start-ups, chances are you’d rush headlong into corrective action. But as this month’s issue points out, that’s exactly what’s happening at most universities, not due to a technical glitch — but rather an intrinsic, perhaps unconscious set of biases and barriers against women in research commercialization. It’s a huge issue for TTOs, and correcting it holds the possibility of unleashing a huge stockpile of latent inventiveness among faculty of the so-called “weaker” sex (yes, even our language and idioms contribute to these barriers).

We’ve devoted the entire June issue to exploring this problem, offering guidance from many of the leading voices tackling gender equity in tech transfer. You’ll find data, resources, examples of approaches and programs, and plenty of advice. Here’s what’s inside:

  • TTOs can take steps to move toward gender parity in commercialization.
  • Is an SBIR/STTR focus right for your women faculty?
  • Outreach and messaging tweaks bring in more women.
  • Money tight? Small, low-cost steps can boost women’s participation.
  • AUTM WIC toolkit: First step in tech transfer’s national push for parity.
  • 4 key internal barriers can close the door on women innovators.
  • Role modeling: Showcase achievements among women faculty.
  • Ohio State REACH sees big jump in patent applications after hiring EIR.
  • U of Florida Collaboratory aims to support the full innovation lifecycle.
  • At Washington U, invention disclosures among women hit 5-year growth of 45%.

Posted June 19th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, May 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, May 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the May 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 5, May 2018

  • Apply a systems approach to prioritize technologies and improve time management. Managing a large portfolio of technologies has always been a daunting task, but now that additional responsibilities are being thrust upon university TTOs, time management has taken on increasing importance. This was a big topic of discussion at AUTM’s annual meeting in February.
  • Get ready for extra compliance burden under revised Bayh-Dole rules. The anticipated revisions in Bayh-Dole regulations, published in the Federal Register on April 13, will no doubt have a significant impact on TTO activities. And while one crystal ball may be more or less clearer than the next, TTO leaders agree they will significantly increase the amount of time needed to assure full compliance — and thus the amount of resources required to do that.
  • Venture search funds floated as way to tap endowments, attract start-up talent Tech transfer leaders know the frustration of having valuable, innovative research that could be translated into a potentially valuable start-up if only the right entrepreneur expressed interest and could secure necessary funding.
  • SAS decision could have chilling effect on university licensing. The recent Supreme Court decision in SAS Institute v. Iancu could change how the Patent Trial and Appeal Board conducts future proceedings, with the Court directing it to provide a full written decision for all claims challenged.
  • New venture fund model at Georgia Tech boasts major corporate investors. What do AT&T, Chick-fil-A, Cox Enterprises, Delta Air Lines, Goldman-Sachs, Georgia-Pacific, The Georgia Power Foundation, Intercontinental Exchange, Invesco, Home Depot and UPS have in common? Besides all having headquarters or regional offices in Atlanta, they are all also board members of Engage Ventures, a venture capital fund and accelerator based at Georgia Tech.

Posted May 15th, 2018