Tech Transfer Central

Technology Transfer Tactics, October 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, October 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the October 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 10, October 2019

  • Ohio IP Promise aims to boost tech transfer, end the exodus of high-tech talent. Frustrated that too many businesses, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and potential research partners have been looking elsewhere for opportunities in the high-tech arena, the state of Ohio, along with its 14 public and two private universities in the region, has announced an initiative aimed at showcasing to the world that the state is open for business.
  • Don’t lose your university’s IP to faculty “consulting time.” It’s the response that tech transfer leaders never want to hear when approaching a faculty member about intriguing new intellectual property: “Oh, I did that as part of my consulting work for a company. It wasn’t done on university time.”
  • Guest Column: Beware of employee equity, the credit cards of the venture community. When hiring venture executives and employees in the early stages of a university start-up, the buzz centers around equity. For successful ventures, these equity rights, often issued when the equity is worth pennies a share, hold the potential of delivering great wealth to those fortunate enough to receive them. However, there is an often ignored drawback to equity compensation.
  • ‘Executives into Business’ program offers pay linked to key milestones. Northern Accelerator — an innovative partnership among a network of UK universities in England’s North East — Durham, Newcastle, Northumbria and Sunderland — is driving a step-change in research commercialization. Connecting academics and business leaders and providing funding and business support, it’s accelerating the translation of outstanding research into commercial opportunities, forming sustainable businesses and creating more and better jobs.
  • Does your university need an innovation czar? Universities have been focusing on innovation and entrepreneurship for many years, forming complex research partnerships with major corporations, building incubators and accelerators, hosting an array of competitions, launching and funding start-ups, and encouraging researchers to focus on the commercial potential of their work. On top of all this, some schools are trying to unify these efforts and reach an even higher level by creating new academic leadership positions.

Posted October 11th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, September 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, September 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the September 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 9, September 2019

  • UC light bulb case may signal more aggressive infringement defense by schools. Those vintage-looking light bulbs that hang in so many trendy bars and restaurants are the subject of a massive lawsuit campaign in which the University of California (UC) system is taking on some of the world’s biggest retailers.
  • Policy alone can’t resolve complications that arise in royalty distribution. It’s tempting to think that in most instances when a patent is issued and then licensed, the royalty situation is fairly straightforward, and that the royalty sharing policy will be adequate to cover any issues that might arise. But that’s rarely the case, states Chris Harris, PhD, director of licensing for Vanderbilt University. “It’s the rarity when something goes by the books,” he says. “This is a complicated topic — much more complicated than most people acknowledge. How you address the complexity depends on many factors that are not often detailed in a policy.”
  • TTOs leverage social media to create their own buzz. Brian Shedd, the director of licensing in the Office of Technology Transfer at the University of Houston (UH), is intrigued by the potential of social media to quickly spread the word about UH technologies, but in seeking guidance from social media veterans, he has come to the realization that some of his early assumptions on how to best jump into the social media space were a bit off.
  • Fellows programs bring extra hands and new blood to TTOs. Technology transfer office-based fellowship programs — typically aimed at training postdocs to learn the ins and outs of research commercialization — can create a win-win situation for the host offices and for PhD students. The offices increase their manpower at lower cost, while PhD students gain exposure to non-academic career paths. These programs, according to those who run them, also enhance the education and research missions of their universities by providing training for graduate students for non-academic careers and increasing the university’s capacity for moving innovation out of the labs into service to society.

Posted September 9th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, August 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, August 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the August 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 8, August 2019

  • Court ruling undermines sovereign immunity, puts university patents at risk. State universities are now in a weaker position when protecting patents from inter partes review (IPR) petitions, after the Federal Circuit court ruled that sovereign immunity does not apply in patent challenges. The ruling could require some universities to reassess their patent enforcement strategies and brace for significantly higher costs from increased IPRs.
  • NYU’s Future Labs blazes path for scalable start-ups and exits-by-acquisition. New York University’s Future Labs has been churning out one start-up after another, and it just crossed the threshold of 20 exits via acquisition – an astounding record of financial success that many TTOs would like to emulate. So how do they do it? The answer involves carefully selecting start-ups to back with the greatest chance for success and monitoring their progress carefully. It also helps that the incubator’s main goal is not to cultivate IP from NYU.
  • Commercialization fellowships help get more innovations off the shelf. Many good ideas are born in university labs. However, the road from an idea to commercialization is fraught with many pitfalls. In some cases, a valuable idea may languish in a lab for lack of an available entrepreneurial scientist to take it further. To help overcome that gap, a number of universities are creating commercialization fellowship programs.
  • Legal Consult: UK court decision highlights need for U.S. patent reform. A recent UK court ruling that a European patent on a groundbreaking invention is valid and infringed contrasts with a U.S. court invalidating a similar patent as not patent eligible. This disconnect between jurisdictions highlights the importance of current efforts to fix U.S. patent law.
  • UGA launches digital images and artwork licensing program. Patented and patentable technologies may “rule the roost” in tech transfer, but that doesn’t mean universities are ignoring other creative forms of innovation that may be desirable to licensees and could represent potential new revenues — not to mention the chance to get more faculty involved in commercialization activity.
  • Should your TTO have its own dedicated grant writer? Usually, grant writers are situated in a sponsored research office. But at Indiana University the Innovation & Commercialization Office, the school’s TTO, has a grant writer of its own.

Posted August 15th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, July 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, July 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the July 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 7, July 2019

  • As innovation-focused competitions flourish on campus, best practices emerge. The tide of competitions focused on innovation and entrepreneurship being sponsored by universities worldwide is nearing flood stage. Business plan competitions, student start-up contests, faculty pitch fests, and Shark Tank style events have become a regular part of campus life. But are they worthwhile, and if so how do you wring the greatest value from them? After all, staging an effective competition on campus requires considerable time, effort and resources, so why go to the trouble when there are so many other priorities?
  • Rutgers team outlines the “Do’s and Don’ts” for faculty pitching to investors. Triggered by a specific event, a team of commercialization experts at Rutgers University set out to fill what they considered to be a significant void in teaching tools for faculty inventors who are about to make their pitch to potential investors.
  • U of AZ’s Asset Development program helps innovations bypass the ‘Valley of Death.’ Good inventions run on their own timeclock. Sometimes, a grant runs out and a funding source is not interested in continuing to invest in the research. In other cases, funding is not available because the project is outside of the grant’s scope of basic scientific discovery. There are almost as many ways to run out of money as there are ideas to develop. In most cases where the funding tap runs dry, the invention is not developed enough gain interest from licensees — a gap in funding now being filled by the U of Arizona’s asset development program.
  • Case Study Spotlight: Culture of patient-centric innovation at Mount Sinai. With 40 full-time employees, Mount Sinai Innovation Partners (MSIP) at the Mount Sinai Health System is one of the larger commercialization offices. Last year, the office engaged with 717 inventors and handled 128 disclosures and 209 patent filings. Behind those numbers are a bevy of programs and strategies that make MSIP an organization to watch and model. TTT spoke with leaders there to get an inside look at key tactics that drive their results, as well as the guiding principles that underlie their successes.
  • Memorial U adopts creator-owned IP policy. Deciding that loosening the grip on IP rights may yield more commercialization in the long run, Memorial University in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, has revised its IP policy to make dealing with the university easier. In fact, the university is giving up its stake in much of the IP developed by students and faculty.

Posted July 15th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, June 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, June 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the June 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 6, June 2019

  • Despite the financial risks, new drug discovery vehicles proliferate on campus. There is nothing like a big hit in the pharmaceutical space to put a university’s long-range plans for new research and infrastructure on a solid footing. In fact, large pharmaceutical companies are increasingly leaving the early-stages of drug development to universities and other research institutions. However, while opportunities in the drug discovery space abound, there is no denying the long, difficult road involved with bringing a new therapeutic to market.
  • Many models can work for EIRs, but successful programs share common threads. Entrepreneurs-in-residence (EIRs) can bring a level of insight and professional experience to university start-ups that might otherwise be difficult to obtain, so they are becoming increasingly common at tech transfer programs. As more schools adopt them, however, it is becoming clear that there is no one correct model for setting up an EIR program.
  • Case Western makes bold move with start-up IPO. A company founded to develop regenerative-medicine technology licensed from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH, is making a bold play for capital with an initial public offering (IPO) on a Canadian exchange. The initial effort is showing success, but the CEO and tech transfer director caution that the approach may not be right for many start-ups.
  • Student ‘Co.Create’ ambassadors support start-ups at U Kentucky. A group of three undergraduate students at the University of Kentucky have been hired as “Co.Create Ambassadors” — newly created paid internships designed to support the university’s New Ventures team.
  • Program looks to boost grant funding for university start-ups in flyover states. When it comes to SBIR and STTR grants, most of the awards go to universities located in urban areas, shortchanging those in more rural areas. There are many reasons for this discrepancy. Universities in more rural areas may not have a proactive Office of Technology and Commercialization, or there may not be a medical school on campus. Or, there may be confusion about eligibility and procedures for obtaining these grants.
  • New UT Dallas partnerships promise to pave more pathways to marketplace. Entrepreneurship leaders at the University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) have been busy working on creating internal spaces and external partnerships that are opening up new avenues for student and faculty entrepreneurs.

Posted June 17th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, May 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, May 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the May 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 5, May 2019

  • Experts urge TTOs: Don’t leave know-how royalty dollars on the table. If your TTO is not routinely seeking know-how royalties when negotiating license agreements — particularly with faculty start-ups — then you are almost certainly leaving dollars on the table. In some cases, big dollars.
  • Consider alternatives to pass-through billing to handle licensee legal fees. Despite the burden it brings, TTOs often act as the middle man between law firms and faculty start-ups or licensees, paying bills for incurred legal fees related to filings, company formation, and other legal work and then invoicing the responsible party. The method originates mostly because the university is the one with the ties to the law firm, and the parties actually incurring the fees are fine with having someone else be the primary contact for payment.
  • Treat start-ups with ‘Texas hospitality’ to build strong relationships. “We started the new ventures operations doing four to six IP-based based start-ups a year,” Wade Fulghum, associate director of new ventures in NC State University’s Office of Research Commercialization, told the audience during at panel session at AUTM 2019 entitled ‘Learn from Texas Hospitality: Treat Your Startups Right.’ “Now, we’ve done 102 companies in the last seven years, building a program from scratch. There were no support mechanisms, no funding, no guidelines.”
  • U of Toronto’s True Blue Fund gives alums new way of giving back. The University of Toronto (U of T) is one of the most successful universities in the world when it comes to research commercialization and start-up formation. Over the past decade, its entrepreneurs have launched more than 500 research-based start-ups, generating more than $1 billion in investment. Despite these successes, however, challenges remain in the area of funding for these start-ups and their ability to take ideas to market.
  • The Quarry at Indiana U offers targeted assistance to university innovators. When Indiana University (IU) turns 200 years old in 2020, it will launch a Bicentennial Strategic Plan that includes a focus on entrepreneurship and innovation. The goal of the plan is to spur economic activity in Indiana and increase the global impact of the university’s innovative research. So, when IU restructured its technology transfer office recently, the Indiana University Research and Technology Corporation (IURTC) began looking ahead to see how IU could better nurture its start-up companies. As a result, they introduced a program called The Quarry, which replaces their previous Spin-Up program.

Posted May 16th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, April 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, April 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the April 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 4, April 2019

  • Lawsuit charging prof stole student’s IP highlights need for layers of due diligence. Technology transfer personnel often talk about how hard it is to get to the finish line with a promising IP asset. This means getting the IP properly developed, licensed and commercialized so that the university and contributing inventors are then on the receiving end of a windfall that can potentially fund research and improvements at the institution for years to come. It’s a rare and wonderful occurrence, to be sure. Cause for celebration.
  • As mission expands, Emory TTO streamlines processes and enhances productivity. When a major university strives for more commercialization even outside usual areas like technology and medicine, the tech transfer office has to be prepared for an increased workload. Adding staff is never an easy route, so improving the work process in a way that takes some of the burden off the existing team might be the only option.
  • AUTM panel reveals how to tap “gold mine” of data for licensing. The collection of data by research institutions is a critical part of innumerable projects, and the size and scope of those data sets is often massive. But what some TTO leaders may not realize, said Bin Yan, director of the Office of Technology Transfer at the University of Miami, is that “you may be sitting on a gold mine.” Yan made her remarks as the head of a panel entitled “Strategies for Monetizing Data at Universities” at the recent AUTM 2019 conference in Austin, TX.
  • New regulations turn up the heat on compliance reporting. It was never easy to report inventions through Interagency Edison (iEdison). Now, with new regulations under the Bayh-Dole Act that have been in effect since October 1, 2018, the stakes are even higher. An action step of the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) plan for incorporating the new regulations is to “Establish a modern platform for reporting data on intellectual property resulting from Federal R&D.” The current iEdison platform is about to be updated.
  • Brandeis rebrands and makes a splash with AUTM exhibit. The newly re-branded tech transfer office for Brandeis University, Brandeis Innovation, is making heads turn — most recently with its exhibit booth at this year’s annual AUTM meeting in Austin, TX. It’s not that common for a TTO to exhibit at AUTM, so what were they doing there and why?

Posted April 16th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, March 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, March 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the March 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 3, March 2019

  • When worlds collide: Help ensure a tight fit between start-up CEOs and faculty founders. Given the dearth of entrepreneurial talent in many locations outside of major tech ecosystems, finding an experienced veteran who is capable and willing to take a technology-based start-up forward is a difficult task. Indeed, the folks in charge of new ventures at universities are typically thrilled to land a candidate with the requisite business skills, technical expertise, and network to attract investors and ultimately make a splash in the marketplace.
  • Board seats can pose dilemmas for university start-ups, TTO leaders. A start-up’s board of directors can be enormously influential in driving the company forward and improving the likelihood of success, so questions related to the makeup of that board are no small matter. University leaders understandably feel like they have a stake in the success or failure of the start-up, so the inclination often is to have someone on the board representing the school.
  • Heard in the Halls: AUTM 2019. The 2019 edition in Austin, TX, was another outstanding year for AUTM’s annual meeting, with nearly 2,000 attendees and the usual complement of practical workshops and sessions. We’ll be featuring in-depth coverage of several of those sessions in coming issues, but in the meantime we’ve gathered our annual collection of short takes and ideas gleaned from attendees and speakers during the event.
  • Incubator makes shift from grant-sponsored program to post-money SAFEs. Velocity, The University of Waterloo’s (Ontario) start-up incubator, is introducing a major change in the way it will be funding its pitch competitions.
  • Alumshares makes investing in start-ups more accessible. A Raleigh, NC, native with a background in real estate is shaking up the way university TTOs are finding funding for university start-ups and other commercialization efforts.
  • University start-ups gain global reach without leaving home. Start-up companies that want to do business internationally often find themselves in a Catch-22. They know they must build contacts in overseas markets, but they don’t have time or money to travel the world. Yet strong international contacts could be the fuel that pushes some start-ups over the edge to long-term success.

Posted March 19th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, February 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, February 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the February 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 2, February 2019

  • Litigation financing can be a ‘no brainer’ for some university patents. With a typical patent lawsuit costing several million dollars to litigate, with no guarantee of recovering that or any more compensation, the idea of having someone else pony up the money can be appealing to any university. For smaller schools that have limited resources but could benefit from the protection of their patents, the appeal is even greater.
  • UC-Santa Cruz digitizes disclosures, NDAs and MTAs to boost faculty service. About one year ago Jeffrey M. Jackson, MS, JD, director of intellectual property management for the University of California at Santa Cruz, implemented a digitized online form for invention disclosures. Since then, 66 invention disclosures have been submitted; prior to last year, he says, the average number of disclosures per year was 44 — a full 50% increase.
  • Total compliance with Bayh-Dole assignments must be goal. The recent update in federal regulations regarding Bayh-Dole compliance has some university TTO leaders wondering just how much is enough when it comes to getting faculty inventors to sign over their intellectual property.
  • U Saskatchewan takes fast and simple approach to licensing. The University of Saskatchewan’s “Fast License,” is the latest entry in the bandwagon among TTOs offering simplified licenses with very favorable contract terms, making a wager that it will be more beneficial in the long run to have many licenses at a lower royalty than just a few at a higher rate.
  • TTO directors share their offices’ goals for 2019. Each time a new year rolls around, it’s a chance to make assessments of past progress and to set goals and resolutions for the upcoming months. We wanted to learn what tech transfer directors had established as their office goals for the upcoming year, and how they planned to meet those objectives.
  • Kentucky’s C3 initiative brings shared tech transfer services statewide. The state of Kentucky — led by its two biggest universities — is launching an unprecedented effort to combine and share tech transfer resources among all the state’s schools in a bid to magnify the impact of research commercialization and “raise all boats.”

Posted February 19th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, January 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, January 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the January 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 1, January 2019

  • TTOs employ divergent approaches to incentive pay for licensing staff. Businesses of all kinds have been using incentive pay to drive behavior for years, but does it work in the murky realm of academia/tech transfer? It’s tricky, to say the least, but surveys suggest that roughly a third of TTOs have some sort of incentive compensation in place. The thing is, the characteristics of these plans vary widely from team-based approaches which include a broad array of performance goals to individually focused plans that key in on a narrow set of indicators.
  • $31.6M award illustrates risks in co-development deals, even decades later. The $31.6 million awarded to Washington University of St. Louis (WUSTL) in a lawsuit levied against its patent license partner the University of Wisconsin is a reminder that co-development deals can come crashing to the ground years after they were initiated. And when they do, more often than not the cause is traced to poorly defined terms.
  • Global EIR programs spreading across U.S. to fill start-up visa gap. According to Science and Engineering Indicators 2018, a National Science Board report, there were about 240,000 international students on temporary visas enrolled in science and engineering graduate programs in 2015. This represented 36% of total U.S. graduate enrollment. Any of these students who opted to stay in the U.S. to create a business encountered immigration laws that, absent a start-up visa, make it difficult for them to stay here.
  • Program seeks to convince UNM grads to ‘boomerang’ to hometown jobs. Sometimes, it seems, you can almost do “too good a job” at helping tech-oriented university graduates pursue successful careers. The problem, you see, is that many of the high prestige universities where graduate school can lead to desirable jobs may be in another state, creating a “brain drain” back home, and losing the potential benefit of a large number of innovators and start-up founders.
  • Marquette’s Explorer Challenge program fuels innovation. It may sound like a NASA project, but it’s really quite grounded. It’s the brainchild of Michael R. Lovell, president of Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI, and it’s called the Explorer Challenge Program. The program was judged so effective that it was recently selected as the winner in the Innovation Category of the University Economic Development Association’s annual Awards of Excellence.

Posted January 16th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, December 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, December 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the December 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 12, December 2018

  • Innovative TTOs look at new ways to leverage the express licensing concept. While many TTOs have adopted express licenses in one form or another, some are still experimenting with new and different ways to leverage the concept — perhaps getting more than just additional licensing transactions out of the process.
  • As faculty start-ups proliferate, so do concerns over COI. This fall, conflict-of-interest (COI) and conflict-of-commitment (COC) issues pushed medical researchers and executives at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City into the national headlines via a series of articles co-published by ProPublica and The New York Times.
  • Purdue commercialization roars after TTO itself becomes entrepreneurial. Purdue University has rapidly become a powerhouse in tech transfer, with frequent news about promising start-ups, new discoveries, and impressive financial returns. The quick rise from an ordinary tech transfer program to one that is now the envy of many schools has people wondering: what’s in the secret sauce?
  • U Mich bell-ringing ceremony generates excitement as start-ups double. Sometimes all it takes is a simple idea that snowballs into something greater. In the case of a new tradition started at the University of Michigan’s TTO, it began with the ringing of a bell. Now, they’re celebrating nearly double the number of start-ups this year compared to last.
  • Brown U putting ecosystem pieces together to spur economic growth. A growing number of universities have incorporated strengthening economic development into their missions, often heavily involving the TTO, but few have adopted as ambitious a plan as the initiative recently launched by Brown University. Brown’s “Innovative Economy” initiative, launched in June, outlines five key areas of focus.

Posted December 18th, 2018

Technology Transfer Tactics, November 2018 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, November 2018 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the November 2018 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue. Not a subscriber already? Subscribe now and get access to this issue as well as access to our online archive of back issues, industry research reports, sample MTAs, legal opinions, sample forms and contracts, government documents and more!

Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 12, No. 11, November 2018

  • VCU Ventures shakes up standard start-up development process. Aggressive licensing terms and a customized pre-accelerator program that includes a faculty/entrepreneur “dating service” and the early use of end-user feedback are among the features that VCU Ventures plans to use to promote start-up development at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond.
  • Express license used by DoD gets deals done at breakneck speed. The only difference between the express license built by TechLink for the Department of Defense (DoD) and the form they previously used for licensing is that it is faster — much faster.
  • Legal disputes with university start-ups often traced to poor contracts. Tech transfer offices focus so much on encouraging faculty entrepreneurs and fostering their start-ups that the need for carefully constructed legal agreements can be seen as just a necessary formality among friends.
  • New tool brings blockchain technology to TTOs for IP protection. Blockchain technology, originally designed for digital currencies like Bitcoin, is now finding its way into other industries — including fields like university tech transfer that need to protect sensitive intellectual property. And, unlike banks’ reluctance to embrace cybercash, the IP industry appears to be welcoming blockchain technology.
  • Oxford updates mission, goals and strategies in bid to expand impact. Although Dr. Matt Perkins, Chief Executive Officer of Oxford University Innovation (OUI), insists that recent shifts in mission statement and strategy are “not really significant changes,” a bullet-point summary begs to differ.
  • Duke’s shift to service-based tech transfer model brings record results. Duke’s Office of Licensing and Ventures (OLV) has hit its stride in 2018, with record setting results in its completed fiscal year.

Posted November 16th, 2018