Tech Transfer Central

Technology Transfer Tactics, October 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, October 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the October 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 10, October 2020

  • A three-pronged approach to controlling costs of managing your patent portfolio. Peter Gordon, a founding and managing member of Patent GC, a team of IP, patent and trademark attorneys, began learning through “grace under fire” some of the keys to managing patent portfolio costs, and he shared those lessons, along with key tools and techniques, with the attendees of an October 5 webinar hosted by Technology Transfer Tactics entitled, “Maintaining a High-Quality Pa­tent Portfolio Under Severe Budget Constraints.”
  • Case shows need to track even minor contributions before patent filing. Inventorship is not always an easy thing to define when dealing with patent law, and even a seemingly minor contribution to a patented invention can determine rights to lucrative revenue streams. A recent Federal Circuit Court ruling decided in favor of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is a case in point, and also serves as a pointed reminder that all contributions must be documented and memorialized to ensure those contributions aren’t swept under the rug in the patent office.
  • UC takes next step with filament light bulb case: Manufacturers and ITC. The University of California’s aggressive campaign to protect its patent on so-called “Edison” filament light bulbs has entered a new stage with a complaint filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), seeking an investigation into the unauthorized importation of the patented technology.
  • Venture mentoring expands to San Antonio as UT system bolsters start-up support. San Antonio has a long pattern of cooperation and collaboration, especially in the biomedical and life science community. Executive leaders from this community interested in supporting new companies are a rich potential resource for the newly launched Venture Mentoring Service (VMS) San Antonio.
  • Tips for running a successful venture mentoring program. The leadership of the VMS San Antonio and UT System VMS offered these pieces of advice for anyone wanting to create a team-based mentoring group.

Posted October 16th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, September 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, September 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the September 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 9, September 2020

  • Gensetix case with U Texas shows need to consider enforcement terms in license agreement. A case involving the University of Texas is yielding lessons about the proper way to construct contracts — particularly with regard to rights to enforcement — as well as the role of sovereign immunity when a licensee seeks to force a state university to join an infringement suit. Unfortunately, it raises as many questions as it answers.
  • Statewide KY partnership to boost economy, compete with innovation centers. When universities are in a rural area, far from the country’s innovation centers, TTOs might think they face an impossible competitive disadvantage against schools near areas like Silicon Valley, Boston, or Chicago. But there is strength in numbers, and some rural schools are partnering with other regional universities, economic development organizations, and government agencies and pooling their resources.
  • UW-Madison’s “Innovate Network” puts access to far-flung resources in one place. A new initiative from UW-Madison and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), administered by UWM’s Discovery to Product (D2P) program, is a powerhouse network and online resource involving more than a dozen campus organizations.
  • Whiteboard2Boardroom connects talent to technology across Kansas and Missouri. Whiteboard2boardroom (W2B) has become a clearinghouse for regional commercialization, linking technologies to executive talent and other resources to advance the technologies beyond the research lab.
  • University College Cork rebrands TTO to embrace wider innovation activity. Restructuring and rebranding is no small undertaking at any time — never mind during a global pandemic. But Rich Ferrie, director of innovation at University College Cork (UCC), didn’t let that stop him from changing direction and switching things up. In fact, he saw it as the ideal time to capitalize on a rebranding and re-imagining of the TTO there to embrace a wider innovation mandate.
  • U Oregon video series helps innovation office tell its story. The short video (under four minutes) begins with a close-up focus on researcher Avinash Bala, PhD, of the University of Oregon’s Institute for Neuroscience, co-founder of the start-up company Perceptivo. Bala provides a detailed description of his research into the hearing of barn owls, how that research led to the development of a system that measures pupil dilation and could potentially be applied to address the hearing of infants. He goes on to share how that led to his developing a technology that fills a need expressed by physicians.

Posted September 15th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, August 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, August 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the August 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 8, August 2020

  • Improve TTO benchmarking by normalizing data and taking a deeper dive behind the numbers. TTOs must understand their own performance data if they are to optimize outcomes, but it also is critical to normalize the data to obtain a useful comparison against other universities that allows you to identify potential areas of improvement.
  • Johns Hopkins contracts team steps up its game amid pandemic. Amid the shutdown of central work locations as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the work of technology transfer offices still has to get done. For many, the disruption has been accompanied by an added sense of urgency as research labs pump out coronavirus-related innovations.
  • Defense of Trade Secrets Act: Part of a TTO’s international IP protection toolbox. While technology transfer offices mainly focus on protecting their IP through the patent process, protecting trade secrets is also a concern — and one that’s growing in prominence amid a trend toward more international collaboration.
  • New philanthropic venture fund at U Michigan snags Amazon investment. When a new university venture fund lands Amazon as one of its early investors, it must be doing something right — and, according to its director, such a vote of confidence is especially important given the challenges this fund is taking on. It also illustrates for other universities seeking participants in start-up funds that big corporates could be fertile ground for prospecting.
  • Study: faculty not motivated by financial incentives, so conduct outreach accordingly. It’s been 40 years since passage of the Bayh-Dole Act, and tech transfer professionals have spent a lot of that time trying to get faculty researchers to buy into a philosophical shift toward thinking about their innovations as having commercial value. It’s still not uncommon for “old guard” faculty to resist any suggestion that they should embrace the tech transfer ethos. Thankfully for TTOs the shift away from commercialization as a dirty word has gradually occurred, due in no small part to TTO outreach efforts.

Posted August 18th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, July 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, July 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the July 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 7, July 2020

  • ‘Go-in-Peace’ license can help smooth feathers when returning IP to faculty. When a TTO decides not to pursue an invention or patent it, the faculty inventor may want rights to the IP. But how to make that transfer can be a difficult proposition.
  • Spotlight on TTOs in pandemic may reveal path to better performance. Universities and TTOs have delivered solutions to the COVID-19 crisis at lightning speed. From epidemiological modeling, viral gene sequencing, rapid testing and vaccine programs, ventilator production, 3D printed PPE manufacture and AI-driven identification, testing and production of therapeutic treatments, universities have been on the front line of the pandemic with a very public profile. By and large this has produced a silver lining to TTOs and research commercialization activity as university labs and their innovation output are in the public spotlight like never before.
  • Should TTO staff be allowed to participate in new ventures? The story spread through the university technology community last year faster than a Facebook cat video. Executives at the higher reaches of the heralded Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) “repeatedly violated policies on financial conflicts of interest, fostering a culture in which profits appeared to take precedence over research and patient care,” The New York Times wrote in an April 4, 2019, article it produced in collaboration with ProPublica. What can TTOs do to avoid a similar fate when their own employees wish to become involved in a start-up that the TTO is supporting?
  • Success rate soars for biotech innovations under Stanford SPARK program. While helping society is often the stated mission of universities, much of their biomedical research never moves beyond the research lab to benefit patients. In many cases, it languishes simply because the inventor just doesn’t know how to take it further. But since 2006, the SPARK at Stanford program has been teaching academics to transform their research so that it can be translated and commercialized for the benefit of society.
  • K-State simplifies disclosure form and sees faculty engagement levels soar. While many disclosure forms are viewed as burdensome for busy innovators, Kansas State University recently worked to revamp its disclosure and create a document that inventors would embrace rather than eschew.

Posted July 15th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, June 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, June 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the June 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 6, June 2020

  • Virtual engagement enables TTOs to scale up outreach and augment ecosystem. Recent innovations in virtual engagement have begun to offer TTOs a more enriched world of options for not only fulfilling but expanding their missions, and the need to respond quickly to the dramatic changes brought on by COVID-19 have both sharpened that focus and proven their worth, according to a panel of experts at a recent webinar, “Virtual Engagement Strategies for TTOs: Scaling Up Online Connectivity Now and Building Future Resiliency,” hosted by TTT.
  • Amid various stages of reopening across the country, TTOs plan for next steps. When shelter-in-place restrictions and social distancing began across the country in March in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, university technology transfer offices focused on making sure they could maintain operations remotely. Now that states and universities have begun the staged lifting of prohibitions, the focus for TTOs is on what comes next.
  • TTOs adjusting to shrinking budgets and hiring freezes. Throughout the country, universities are cutting budgets, resulting in hiring freezes, furloughs, and stalled plans for expansion. TTOs are tightening their belts, but so far, they are experiencing more of a bump in the road than a full-blown train wreck. Long-term, it appears that university mission-based goals will remain intact.
  • Leverage your TTO’s database to create impactful technology marketing reports. Industry-specific feedback on early stage technologies is critical to technology transfer offices in informing patenting strategy, providing feedback to inventors, and nominating technologies for further de-risking. Many offices recognize the value of this information and have formed marketing teams and internship programs specifically tasked with sourcing industry feedback.
  • Equity crowdfunding may be tempting for university start-ups as investments dry up. With venture capitalists less approachable during the pandemic shutdown, TTOs are looking for investment alternatives for university start-ups and some are wondering if equity crowdfunding is a good option. It can be, the experts say, but tread carefully and consider the potential downsides.

Posted June 16th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, May 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, May 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the May 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 5, May 2020

  • TTOs are stepping up to meet the COVID-19 challenge. It will most likely take a village to combat COVID-19. If that’s the case, technology transfer offices around the nation have pitched a giant tent right in the town square. We spoke to many people in TTOs who are going above and beyond to do whatever is possible to help. Here are a few examples.
  • With start-up investments scarce in COVID times, find ways to pivot. The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the prospects and bottom line of university start-ups as they find investments difficult to come by and their usual work coming to a halt with the rest of the economy. Some are pivoting to other work in the meantime, but the effects of the pandemic are likely to hurt many start-ups for months, if not longer.
  • Are zombie start-ups haunting your TTO? Are university TTOs essentially gaming the system when they dutifully report each year on the number of start-ups they have nurtured? That seems to be the suggestion of a provocative new analysis by professors at Brigham Young University (BYU) and Utah Valley University.
  • Oregon universities band together to set the rules for co-owned IP. Five Oregon research universities — Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland, the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon State University in Corvallis, Portland State University, and the Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls — have launched a collaborative model to boost innovation via a series of three agreements that clarify ownership of intellectual property derived from inter-university collaborative research projects, as well as inter-university employment. The goal is to reduce cost barriers and other blockages that can stymie collaborative research.
  • U Chicago TTO has attorney on loan from law firm. The Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of Chicago is enjoying an unusual relationship with a law firm that allows it to have an intellectual property attorney on site full time, devoting all her attention to tech transfer. The unique arrangement means the attorney can aid directly with patent prosecution and implementing new procedures and contracts, while also giving the university favored status with the law firm.

Posted May 14th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, April 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, April 2020 Issue

The following is a list of the articles that appear in the April 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. Due to the urgent nature of the coronavirus pandemic and our extensive coverage of how TTOs are addressing COVID-related challenges, we are opening up this issue for free to all.

Click here for the April issue

These are the sample agreements mentioned in the first story:

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 4, April 2020

Special Report: Tech transfer and the COVID-19 pandemic. This issue’s first three articles address some of the urgent challenges and profound changes TTOs are facing — and adapting to — as the coronavirus pandemic and the associated shutdown of university offices and labs continues. Technology Transfer Tactics has designated Direct Relief (www.directrelief.org) as its charity of choice for those wishing to assist healthcare workers with needed supplies. For more information see the drawing on page 63, which was kindly donated for reproduction by Italian artist Sara Paglia.)

  • TTOs respond to urgent pandemic needs with ‘war time’ licensing. When a scientist at the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) in Ohio developed software that detects the COVID-19 virus in seconds using an X-ray, the tech transfer leaders knew they couldn’t wait the usual months or years to get it to market. Instead, they had it licensed in two and a half days and on the market in just seven.
  • Coronavirus brings challenges and changes to TTO operations. University researchers and tech transfer leaders have pivoted to prioritize research related to COVID-19, with streamlined licensing and pledges to make technology available free of charge during a time of crisis.
  • TTOs adapt to remote work but still learning on the fly. Leading TTOs from across the country shared their experiences in the COVID-19 crisis during the recent free webinar “Managing TTO Operations During the COVID-19 Pandemic and Planning for Future Disruptions.”
  • Take step to avoid patent-killing ‘pre-print’ disclosures. In the academic world, where publishing is paramount to tenure and career advancement, there is always the risk that a public disclosure will eliminate the innovator’s — and their university’s — ability to protect an invention.
  • U Cincinnati opens its pre-accelerator program to other institutions. The University of Cincinnati has opened its pre-accelerator, Venture Lab, to not only start-ups formed out of UC, but also those from Wright State University, Xavier University, the University of Dayton and Cincinnati State Technical and Community College.

Posted April 16th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, March 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, March 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the March 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 3, March 2020

  • Are universities doing enough to ensure global access to their innovations? Over the years there has been considerable discussion about the need for universities to ensure their innovations make it into the hands of disadvantaged populations. Indeed, point nine in AUTM’s much heralded In the Public Interest: Nine Points to Consider in Licensing University Technology states “universities should consider including provisions that address unmet needs, such as those of neglected patient populations or geographic areas.”
  • Cornell program offers on-ramp for women entrepreneurs. The number of women and minorities pursuing STEM fields at Cornell University has surpassed the national average and is still growing. That good news is muted somewhat, however, by the fact that the number of Cornell women in STEM who hold patents and participate in entrepreneurial programs lags well behind Cornell men.
  • Turning foreign students into start-up founders: A trip that requires a savvy guide. Universities, research parks, and society at large benefit enormously from the innovative minds that come to America from around the world, but only if our immigration system doesn’t slam the door in their faces.
  • Case Western finds CES to be a goldmine for promoting start-ups. TTOs and other university departments devoted to commercialization and growth for their start-ups have often found benefit from networking at industry conferences and exhibitions — a strategy that may be paused during the coronavirus pandemic but will return as a key marketing strategy. And it’s unlikely that many schools have had as much success as the LaunchNet program at Case Western Reserve University has had at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES).
  • UW creates Innovation Roundtable to help guide ecosystem development. The University of Washington (UW) has tapped a high-powered group of community leaders, investors and entrepreneurs to the UW Innovation Roundtable, which held its first meeting in January. The panel was formed to bring the perspective, expertise, and assistance of a broad range of key stakeholders to help grow the region’s innovation ecosystem and help guide commercialization, economic development, and partnership initiatives in concert with university leadership.

Posted March 17th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, February 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, February 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the February 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 2, February 2020

  • Foreign courts may offer cheaper, faster alternative in patent infringement litigation. As anyone who has experienced it knows, engaging in a patent infringement fight in the U.S. is a serious undertaking. It’s expensive, time consuming, and can distract an organization from its core business. But when a valuable invention is being challenged, there are only a few routes a university can take. Litigation is one of the roughest, but there are ways to reduce the pain and even gain leverage over more well-heeled adversaries — and it may involve foreign jurisdictions.
  • Legal Consult: Universities should consider ITC for IP protection. In an era of globalized supply chains, products incorporating university IP are frequently made abroad in jurisdictions where IP protection is unavailable or ineffective. That’s among the reasons that, in their enforcement efforts, universities and other research institutions should not overlook a powerfully effective venue: the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC).
  • Gateway to IP program seeds patent know-how in students, cuts legal costs. Wichita State University in Kansas aims to promote its IP as much as any other major university, but it faces a challenge that many others don’t: There are hardly any registered patent practitioners in Wichita, compared to more than 50 in nearby Omaha or Tulsa.
  • To optimize social media, differentiate between branding and tech marketing. Social media can be used effectively both to enhance brand-building and to spread your tech marketing messages. However, cautioned two experts in the field, it’s important for you to understand the difference between the two in making optimal use of your social media tools.
  • Innovation@UCalgary provides holistic, integrated support for inventors. It takes an inventor with an entrepreneurial mindset to come up with ideas that benefit society. But it also takes a team of technical people, legal advisors, investors, marketing specialists, and more, to deliver the inventor’s idea.
  • FounderHunt pitching event seeks to pair entrepreneurs with new technologies. Kind of like a university ‘Shark Tank,’ FounderHunt is a start-up pitch event — just in reverse. A new University of Louisville (UofL) program, FounderHunt is in an annual event pitching IP from research universities to entrepreneurs to use for their next start-up.

Posted February 14th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, January 2020 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, January 2020 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the January 2020 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 14, No. 1, January 2020

  • Oxford U’s unique model brings student power to bear on languishing IP assets. Tech transfer programs usually have a portfolio of commercialization projects that are in that iffy zone: They do have potential but they are not the obvious choice for a spinout with a high likelihood of success. They also are not right for repeat non-exclusive licensing to companies, and they don’t have a ready-made home with a company where the inventor has a longstanding relationship.
  • TTO New Year’s resolutions: Here’s what your colleagues are focusing on in 2020. From more diversity and inclusion to improving inventor education and staff support, TTOs have a slew of New Year’s resolutions to tackle in 2020. TTT spoke with tech transfer execs across the country to get a flavor for what they see as their biggest challenges and priorities for the coming year.
  • Law firm sued over missed publication date, potentially costing a school millions. When it comes to patenting new inventions, the publication date is critical one because it starts a one-year clock for filing a patent application. But in the digital world, what constitutes a publication date may get confused, particularly for those who’ve long assumed the meaning to be associated with a print publication.
  • Consistency, standardization are keys to solidifying your TTO’s data integrity. It takes a good deal of time to plan properly when implementing a new database (or cleaning up an existing one) and instituting processes that will lead to greater data integrity. However, failure to do so will take even more time and will ultimately cost more money.
  • WVU’s Vantage Ventures helps start-ups overcome hurdles. A new initiative at West Virginia University (WVU) is described as “the finishing piece of the puzzle” for university start-up support in the state. The program — Vantage Ventures — is the latest addition to a series of developments by the university to enhance the state’s business environment.
  • ‘Accelerator’ classes teach entrepreneurial mindset with an academic focus. Are there necessary skills that all professionals need, whether they work in business, public service, science, education, medicine, or anything else? Some would suggest that entrepreneurial thinking is critical across all professions. Entrepreneurial thinking encompasses the concepts of problem-solving and solutions validation, risk mitigation, and managing failure. The need for these skills explains why entrepreneurship has become a popular curriculum at the undergraduate level.

Posted January 16th, 2020

Technology Transfer Tactics, December 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, December 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the December 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 11, December 2019

  • A new push to recognize innovation activities in promotion and tenure. Technology transfer professionals have long lamented how difficult it is to coax promising young researchers — even those with entrepreneurial aspirations — into actually engaging in commercialization activities until they have achieved tenure. The issue is highlighted at technical meetings and academic conferences year after year, but not much seems to change in the minds of many observers. Why is that?
  • TTOs introduce awards programs to recognize outstanding staff. Employee morale may be difficult to quantify, but nonetheless several TTOs have instituted awards programs whose main rationale is to let outstanding staff members know that their work has been noticed and appreciated.
  • ‘Double Down Experiment’ seeks to help Purdue start-ups scale up. The Purdue Foundry has completed the selection of the first cohort for its Double Down Experiment — nine businesses they’d helped launch that are now ready “to reach the next level” of their development.
  • Leveraging data in healthcare innovations while protecting patient privacy. Collection and analysis of aggregated patient data is both a source of disease-fighting discoveries — new procedures, methods and products — and a potential source of revenue for universities and their health systems, who are increasingly using data in a host of new technologies.
  • Equalize 2020: Symposium and pitch competition seeks to empower women innovators. A little over a year ago, Nichole Mercier, assistant vice chancellor and managing director of the Office of Technology Management at Washington University in St. Louis (WashU), got a call from the Association of American Medical Colleges. The association wanted to nominate WashU’s Women in Innovation & Technology program for their “Innovations in Research and Research Education Award.” Mercier was flattered and honored and put together a package for them to consider. In doing so, she reached out to women who had gone through the program — and what she heard was disheartening.

Posted December 12th, 2019

Technology Transfer Tactics, November 2019 Issue


Technology Transfer Tactics, November 2019 IssueThe following is a list of the articles that appear in the November 2019 issue of Technology Transfer Tactics monthly newsletter. If you are already a current subscriber click here to log in and access your issue.

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Technology Transfer Tactics
Vol. 13, No. 11, November 2019

  • Take steps to soften the inevitable dilution of start-up equity. Universities often are eager to invest in their promising start-ups, getting in on the ground floor of what they hope will be financial success for everyone. But in so many cases, the university feels like they’re left out of the party when the company hits it big.
  • Indiana U’s new Alumni Angel Network adds arrow to its funding quiver. For many universities, fundraising is the primary focus of their relationship with their alumni. However, some universities are offering alums a different way of engaging with their alma maters: alums who qualify as angel investors can invest in university start-ups.
  • Research Bridge Partners looks to level the playing field for mid-continent universities. Did you know that over the past five years, 75% of federal research funding has gone to institutions outside of California, Massachusetts and New York, while nearly 80% of venture investment went to companies located in those three states? Research Bridge Partners is working hard to change that.
  • UCSD launches new innovation portal driven by user feedback. At a large university, students with entrepreneurial ambitions may face a myriad of choices when it comes to resources. Faculty and staff, alumni, and other stakeholders in the ecosystem have similar challenges. Helping them explore more easily through their options and arrive more quickly at the resource they seek is one of the overriding goals of the new Innovation Portal at the University of California-San Diego.
  • U Buffalo students BLAST their way to an invention and start-up in five days. Your mission, if you choose to accept it: Work with a multidisciplinary team to create a solution to a major surgical complication and start a business around the idea.
  • WPI: The tiny tech transfer office that could. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, a “tiny tech transfer office,” is hitting it out of the ballpark. With a research budget of just $32 million, the TTO brought in 67 invention disclosures in 2018, a threefold increase since 2012.
  • School mascot stars in Auburn TTO’s patent process video. The Office of Innovation Advancement and Commercialization at Auburn University recently came up with a novel way to explain the patent process to faculty and students.

Posted November 14th, 2019