VCs and Angels Speak to TTOs: What We Want to See, And What We Don’t
Originally presented September, 2008

Customer Testimonial: “Investment turn-ons and turn-offs from an investor point of view were interesting and informative”

It may seem like finding VC and angel investors for your start-ups and promising technologies is like finding a needle in a haystack. But from the investor perspective, it’s often just as difficult to find the most promising jewels of innovation among the hundreds of proposals that cross their desks. Your chances of grabbing their interest and securing the funding you need are increased dramatically when you do your homework, know the specific investor’s “hot spots,” and make your pitch in the way VCs and angels want to see it.

How can you learn the insider secrets that will get your innovations the attention they deserve from these very choosy investors? How about a direct approach -- ask them!

Technology Transfer Tactics has lined up two prominent investors who specialize in university technologies -- one a VC, the other an Angel -- to give you insight into the nitty-gritty details of what they want -- and expect -- when being courted for funding. You’ll leave this presentation armed with practical advice, key recommendations, and specific techniques direct from the investors themselves. Then use their guidance and specific “do’s and don’ts” to give your TTO and your researchers the very best opportunity to secure critical commercialization funds.

Get inside the heads of the “money men” -- and get the funding your technologies need!

In this 90 minute program, you’ll discover the keys to piquing investor interest, the supporting data and research they want to see, and the ill-conceived approaches that turn them cold.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

Meet Your Faculty

Eric Nicolaides is the founder and Managing Partner of Wildcat Venture Management. Mr. Nicolaides conceived of and built the Wildcat organization to address the growing disconnect between venture capital and academic technology transfer. Wildcat has evaluated more than 250 opportunities from more than 20 academic institutions. Mr. Nicolaides brings deep technology transfer experience to Wildcat. He has collaborated with Harvard Medical School, The University of Texas and other major universities in the field of point-of-care diagnostics. He has also worked on other technology commercialization projects including Bio Molecular Switches, Inc., a Seattle-area startup owned by two University of Washington Engineering professors, and Houston-based Interlok, LLC., a private digital security technology company. Mr. Nicolaides is a frequent guest speaker on technology commercialization issues and is a member of the Industry Advisory Group for the Cornell Center for Technology Enterprise and Commercialization.

Robert L. Morrison has been involved in all phases of technology business development. He is a founder of Sunquest Information Systems which became the world’s largest vendor of hospital laboratory information automation products. Since leaving Sunquest, Mr. Morrison has spent a number of years consulting with emerging companies and assisting them in their business development. Today he is Executive Director of Tucson’s Desert Angels, a group of local investors that focus on early stage companies. He is also a Mentor in Residence in the University of Arizona’s Eller College of Management’s McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship.

Who Should Listen
Technology transfer managers and professionals, research commercialization directors, licensing specialists, start-up managers, researchers and entrepreneurs, university research VPs, IP consultants and attorneys, economic development officials, incubator and research park directors, and others with an interest in securing investment funding for academic technology.